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Archive for January, 2017

Too Close to Home

We exit January with our final Fire theme episode – Too Close to Home. My guest is Martha Brabec, Foothills Restoration Specialist with the City of Boise. Martha joined the City in this newly formed position soon after this summer’s Table Rock fire. Boise residents who live near the Table Rock burn zone know well that this event was too close to home and is certainly not the first time that wildfires have threatened Treasure Valley homes. But, Boise is situated in the middle of the giant sagebrush sea that covers a large portion of the western United States and fire is now a fixture of this landscape. The introduction of cheat grass and changing weather patterns have shifted the fire regime immensely. We now find ourselves increasingly managing for fire prevention and restoring fire damaged sagebrush lands.

Martha Brabec

Martha Brabec

Martha provides our listeners with an overview of life in the modern sagebrush sea, and what the City of Boise is doing to preserve and manage the foothills lands that our community has invested in.

Use the player below to listen to our conversation.

Join us for the Ice theme in February by tuning in Tuesdays at 3pm on Radio Boise at 89.9 FM or 93.5 FM in the Treasure Valley. Or stream us online at http://www.radioboise.org for your weekly dose of Building a Greener Idaho.

Got an idea for a show? We’d love to hear about it! Contact us at buildingagreeneridaho@gmail.com

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Motivational Fire

My guest this week is best selling author Colin Beavan. Colin and I begin to wind down the Fire portion of our Fire and Ice theme on BAGI. We discuss his books No Impact Man and How to be Alive, A Guide to the Kind of Happiness that Helps the World and discover that the combined themes of these works is a good stoke for the Building a Greener Idaho listener’s fire. No Impact Man chronicles Colin’s experience aspiring to living a year of zero environmental impact life style in New York City. How to Be Alive provides practical advise for creating change in your life and moving towards your life of highest service.

Author Colin Beavan

Author Colin Beavan

Listen to our conversation on the player below.

Join us for the final Fire episode of our series on Fire & Ice Tuesday January 31st at 3pm on Radio Boise at 89.9 FM or 93.5 FM in the Treasure Valley. Or stream us online at http://www.radioboise.org

Got an idea for a show? We’d love to hear about it! Contact us at buildingagreeneridaho@gmail.com

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jenpierceOur two month series on Fire & Ice continues with a look at more extreme fires in our region due to human caused climate change and the associated risks for debris flows after the fires which can damage infrastructure, personal property, and fish habitat. Today I speak with Associate Professor of Geosciences Jen Pierce from Boise State University. I will talk with her about the ways in which our landscape is changing due to high intensity fires, how to prevent human caused fires and how all of this relates in the context of climate change.
pioneer fire burn scar.JPGJoin us for the continuation of our series on Fire & Ice today at 3pm on Radio Boise at 89.9 FM or 93.5 FM in the Treasure Valley. Or stream us online at http://www.radioboise.org

A podcast of our interview will be available here after the show airs.

Got an idea for a show? We’d love to hear about it! Contact us at buildingagreeneridaho@gmail.com

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Idaho’s Pioneer fire had the dubious distinction of being the largest wildfire in the US during the 2016 fire season. The Pioneer fire burned 188,000 acres of the Boise National forest in Southern Idaho and the total cost of fighting the fire exceeded $95 million. A fire of this magnitude does not go unnoticed and even attracts international interest.

Although the fire was unfortunate, wildfires in Idaho are commonplace. Just as the snow accumulates to a lesser or greater degree each winter in the mountains, the hot and dry conditions of the summer produce wildfire seasons of varying intensity. Because of this natural rhythm that occurs each year in the Gem State, Building a Greener Idaho has chosen a Fire and Ice theme for the months of January and February. January will focus on fire, February on ice.

We begin January’s series on fire in Idaho by interviewing Sicilian artist Giuseppe Licari. Giuseppe’s exhibit Contrapunto (Italian for Counterpoint) was recently hosted at Ming Studios  and featured actual burnt trees from the Pioneer fire to demonstrate the potentially disastrous outcomes of wildfires, and to inspire community efforts to manage a healthy environment. Giuseppe hopes that his work inspires viewers to consider all aspects of our responsibility to maintain the health of our environment, from electing wise leaders, to making connections between our actions and changes to our climate that increase the propensity for mega-fires such as the Pioneer fire. Ming Studios founder Jason Morales joins our conversation to add context on the role of local art exhibitions in inspiring a sense of community and responsibility and exposing the public to ideas that can be hidden from overt view in our large and multi-faceted world.

Cpntrapunto - an exhibit by Giuseppe Licari created from the ashes of Idaho's 2016 Pioneer fire.

Contrapunto – an exhibit by artist Giuseppe Licari created from the ashes of Idaho’s 2016 Pioneer fire.

Contrapunto has moved on from Boise, but you can view images of the haunting installation on Ming Studio’s website.

You can listen to a podcast of our interview below.

Got an idea for a show? We’d love to hear about it! Contact us at buildingagreeneridaho@gmail.com

 

 

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