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Image result for proposed boise stadiumBack in the fall of 2017 a feasibility and economic impact study was released regarding a proposed multi-use downtown Boise Sports Park. The stadium would be the new home to the Boise Hawks, an expansion team for the United Soccer League, and utilized as a venue for large concerts and other special events. Now with the news that the developer is looking again at the original site off Americana and has scheduled a neighborhood meeting for April 17th, the conversation about the proposed project is heating up again.

Building a Greener Idaho contributors took some time to sit down and discuss what this proposed project could mean for Boise and some of the issues Boise citizens are raising. It’s a new Round Table format for our show and we hope you will tune in Tuesday, April 17th at 3pm on Radio Boise at 93.5 FM, 89.9 FM or by streaming us at http://radioboise.us/.

 

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Today I speak with Austin Hopkins from the Idaho Conservation League about his work on air quality and transportation in the Treasure Valley and the rest of Idaho.

As the fastest growing state in the nation, now is the time to increase the level of dialogue around growth, density, transportation infrastructure, and the potential impacts on our air quality should we fail to make the right choices now.

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Among the many groups, agencies and local governments working on transportation planning, the Idaho Conservation League wants to engage their members and constituents in this important dialogue through the lens of air quality and ultimately, climate change.

Unfortunately our FM broadcast is down currently (click here for status) but as always you can stream Radio Boise online on your mobile device or computer via www.radioboise.us

 

Light pollution limits 80% of Americans from seeing the Milky Way at night.  Light pollution disorients turtles trying to see the glare of the moonlight as an indicator of water.  The blue/white colors we use in lights disrupt our production of melatonin and therefore our sleep cycle.

But its not all bad news. In the face of the challenges caused by light pollution, a partnership between communities and public sectors arose to help designate Central Idaho as the nation’s first gold-tier dark sky reserve.

Today’s show is a rebroadcasting of an Idaho Environmental Forum that was presented in December featuring Astronomer Matt Benjamin and Mayor of Stanley Steve Botti.  Their biographies can be found below.  

January 17th is the next Idaho Environmental Forum – their annual Legislative Gala.  For information on the gala and IEF, click here.

Steve Botti

Steve worked for the National Park Service for 35 years before retiring in 2007. During that time he worked in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, served as the Chief of Natural Resources Management at Yosemite National Park, and as the National Wildland Fire Program Planning Manager for the Washington Office of the National Park Service. He authored An Illustrated Flora of Yosemite National Park in 2001, which was awarded the Henry Allan Gleason Award from the New York Botanical Garden for the outstanding publication in plant taxonomy in 2003. In 2007 he was awarded the Meritorious Service Honor Award from the Secretary of the Interior for career achievements in serving National Parks. From 1987 through 2010 he taught field botany seminars for the Yosemite Association and the Jepson Herbarium at the University of California.

Steve and his wife Vicki retired to Stanley in 2007, and he was elected President of the Stanley City Council in 2008. He has continued to serve in that position through 2017, and was elected Mayor of Stanley this past November. Outside of work, Steve spends as much time as he can enjoying rivers rafting, cross-country skiing, hiking, and the dark night sky in the Sawtooth and Boulder-White Cloud mountains.

Matt Benjamin

Matt and his family currently live in Boulder, Colorado, though Matt has been spending time in Idaho for 35 years. His family connection to Idaho began when his grandfather used to take his dad to Ketchum on the train

from Los Angeles. Matt spent the past 12 years working for the University of Colorado at Boulder as an Astronomer and the Education Programs Manager for the Fiske Planetarium. While at the Planetarium,

Matt collaborated on several NASA research grants and educational programs with our federal labs and aerospace companies. Matt is currently Board President of the Growe Foundation, which initiates school garden programs through lesson plans for 19 elementary schools in the Boulder Valley School District.

Got an idea for a show? We’d love to hear about it! Contact us at buildingagreeneridaho@gmail.com

Donovan Rypkema shares quantitative insights into the economic Impacts of Historic preservation.

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